tire myths

Tire Facts and Tire Myths

Some people just aren’t sure about what’s true and false when it comes down to their tires. Not all tires are the same and limited knowledge about tires change perceptions and myths begin to take form. But the topic of tires is not that simple, so RightTurn is here to help you distinguish the difference between the tire facts and tire myths.

  1. Myth 

Of course I know my tire’s recommended tire pressure. It’s on the sidewall.

         Fact

The place to look for the correct tire pressure from the tire manufacturer is NOT on the sidewall. Many people swear by this, but the sidewall number is the maximum allowable pressure for that particular tire. The recommended tire pressure can be found in two places: the owner’s manual, or the driver’s doorjamb sticker. The right tire pressure helps your tires establish better fuel efficiency, promotes even and longer treadwear, and carries the vehicle’s load. Underinflated tires may overheat and lead to tire failure, while an overinflated tire could lose traction because less tread is in contact with the road.

  1. Myth

My original tires had a speed rating up to 130 mph. Since I don’t drive that fast, I can pay less for a lower speed rated tire.

         Fact

The speed rating is a very important aspect of the selection process when purchasing tires. Originally developed in Europe to categorize the capabilities of tires on high-speed roads, tires that exceed their speed rating would be at risk of failing dangerously. Speed ratings not only indicate how fast a car can travel while handling safely, but also provide precise cornering ability. If saving money means more to you, then you risk driving dangerously on ineffective tires and lose your car’s capability to maneuver efficiently and safely.

  1. Myth

I only need two new tires, so the new ones should go on the front.

         Fact

No matter what type of car you have, whether it’s front-, rear-, or four-wheel drive, new tires (if only getting two) should always go on the back. Rear tires provide the stability in your ride. With lower tread on the back, your rear will spin out on a wet highway because your front tires aren’t sliding. No matter how deep the tread is, all tires will hydroplane if the water is deep enough and you’re traveling fast enough.

But with deeper tread on the back tires, you can easily regain control by letting off the gas. If those same deep tread tires are on the front, well good luck to ya.

  1. Myth

The Tire Pressure Monitoring System tells me if my tires are underinflated.

         Fact

Yes and no. Sure, if that weird little TPMS light comes on, one or more of your tires could be underinflated. Having said that, it only comes on when your tires are 25% underinflated below the manufacturer’s recommended tire pressure. Becoming dependent on the technology can lead people to be lazy about tire pressure. The only real way to keep safe is to check your pressure once a month to make sure you’re driving on properly inflated tires. This will ensure your tires are staying fuel efficient, wear evenly, and grip the road the way they were intended.

  1. Myth

Buying tires is hard!

         Fact

No it isn’t! Even if you have no idea what you’re doing, RightTurn takes the hassle out of buying tires. You can save time and money by purchasing online from RightTurn.com. With a user-friendly user interface and in just four easy steps, we’ll help you select the tires that meet your individual needs that are approved by your automaker. RightTurn ships your tires to your nearest installer for free and you pay an all-in-one price. There are no hidden fees and you’ll be back on the road in no time.